Share:
Notifications
Clear all

Porsche CEO believes in e-cars and hydrogen  


schreiberling
Posts: 74
Moderator
(@schreiberling)
Mitglied
Joined: 6 months ago

The electric Porsche Taycan exceeds all sales expectations despite the corona crisis. "Despite the closure of dealerships and factories during the first corona wave, we will exceed our original target of 20,000 vehicles sold this year," Blume said in an interview with Auto Motor und Sport. This is astonishing because Porsche was only able to sell 4480 units worldwide in the first half of the year because of Corona. By the end of October, sales rose dynamically to 10,944, which means that Porsche would have to sell another 10,000 Taycans in just three months from October to December.

"We expect around 50 percent of our vehicles to be fully or partially electrified as early as 2025. And if you extrapolate that over time, the proportion of electric vehicles will continue to increase. Alongside the Taycan, the main driver of this development is the Macan. "On the way to the 50 percent in 2025, the Macan with electric drive will play a major role. Even Porsche icons like the 911 do not stop at electrification, but only cautiously. "We will not fully electrify the 911. We are thinking more of a very sporty hybridization, as we know it from motor sports," says Blume.

While the VW group, according to a report in the Süddeutsche Zeitung, is massively fighting against e-fuels and hydrogen as a fuel at the EU Commission, Porsche boss Oliver Blume has once again explicitly spoken out in favor of hydrogen as a fuel for conventional combustion engines as well as for synthetic fuels - similar to BMW boss Oliver Zipse, who called for the expansion of the hydrogen filling station infrastructure for cars and trucks in the summer. "Synthetic fuels are not in competition with electromobility, but complement it sensibly, especially in a backward direction," said Blume in an interview with auto motor und sport. Blume cites the next ten years as the time frame for their use.

A prerequisite for the use of hydrogen, for example, is that it is "produced in places around the world" where "sustainable energy is available in surplus," said Blume. "From the synthesis with CO2 from the air, green methanol is produced and converted into fuel". This methanol has many advantages over pure hydrogen, he said, namely "transport without cooling and compression, the use of today's infrastructure and the use in traditional combustion engines with high efficiency without an additional fuel cell in the car".

At the same time, Porsche intends to use these fuels in practice soon. "In the future, we are thinking about their use in motor sports, the Porsche Experience Centers, but also in existing vehicles in the future". Blume is thinking of a period of "over about ten years - when we think of one hundred percent sustainable, designed fuels".

Topic Tags
Share: